How to Build — And Scale — A Successful Sales Team

December 2, 2019
Updated: December 9, 2019
Written by Built In Staff

When scaling a sales team, it's incorrect to assume that hiring more salespeople will equal more revenue. 

First, the duties of each role and how success will be measured should be well thought out and documented. Based on that, new hires must be placed in positions they’re well suited for in relation to their skills and ambitions. Furthermore, new applicants should fit within the culture of their sales team and the company as a whole. 

But this only scratches the surface when it comes to building an all-star sales team. We heard from 18 sales managers who shared how they grew their teams while positioning employees for career success. 

 

Grubhub team members chatting
grubhub

Grubhub

Kevin Kearns, senior vice president of Grubhub’s restaurant network, said the food delivery platform’s sales team is all about recreating success.

By documenting and repeating certain key processes — like seeking specific traits in applicants and developing a playbook of best sales practices — the sales staff is able to hire talented individuals and set them up for successful futures at the company.

 

What’s your blueprint for building a sales team? How did you identify these keys and how have they made an impact as you build a team?

In the past year we doubled our sales organization. Our goal is achieving both efficiency and effectiveness throughout the sales organization. For efficiency, we have removed barriers that get in the way of selling time, eliminated red tape to get deals done and set metrics that our teams need to achieve each day.

For effectiveness, we have streamlined our sales process to be consultative and value-focused, created a detailed playbook based on best practices of our top sellers and built a recognition program that keeps our teams energized each day. To round it out, we have built a culture of excellence, which includes recognition programs celebrating top performers and specific performances, and created a sales council that address areas of opportunity on behalf of their colleagues.

We executed a discovery process and identified key areas of opportunity across areas like sales process, market coverage and many others. We identified issues in each category and prioritized our action plans based on what had the biggest impact. We also structured our management team to be primarily focused on rep development.

 

"Hires now get a full month of onboarding and hands-on coaching...”

 

When scaling, how do you ensure your team doesn’t lose the elements that made it so successful in the first place?

Instead of hiring the way we always did, we needed to figure out how to bring on talented individuals at scale. To do that, we evaluated the traits of our best sellers and created a hiring profile and interview process that was replicable and increased the likelihood of a great fit. Once on board, instead of ad hoc training and shadowing, we reinvented the training process to be more effective. Our new hires now get a full month of onboarding and hands-on coaching, which is significantly more robust than in the past. We also invested in our trainers, all of whom have been successful sellers at Grubhub. The data shows our new hires are more productive than ever and we have reduced turnover in the first six months.

In terms of culture, we bring all new sellers into our headquarters to observe first-hand the winning attitude of our team. We then pair sellers with mentors that exhibit the habits of success within our team. Finally, we constantly reinforce the cultural attributes that make our team great: teamwork, professionalism, high performance, effort, fun and customer obsessed.

 

Sprout Social team in group photo
Sprout Social

Sprout Social

Director of Sales Development Brian Mullin said Sprout Social wants its sales team to do more than meet quotas. The company wants staff to feel like they have a voice, and feel comfortable making their opinions heard.

To that end, Mullin said employee feedback at the social media management platform is incorporated into everything from training to building company culture.

 

What’s your blueprint for building a sales team? How did you identify these keys and how have they made an impact as you build a team?

Building a successful team starts with identifying key traits your top performers exemplify. We articulate a vision for our people that inspires them to do their best work and reach for more than they thought was possible. Every person on our team has a unique reason for choosing Sprout to start or continue their career, but regardless of the reason, that commitment is something we value and show gratitude for.

 

"We base our hiring processes, training and culture off of the feedback from our employees.”

 

When scaling, how do you ensure your team doesn’t lose the elements that made it so successful in the first place?

The strength of our culture is foundational to why our people love coming to work everyday and it’s important that our individual contributors feel like they have a voice in the decisions we make as a business. We focus on encouraging feedback across all levels of the organization. When team members are able to openly share their thoughts and ideas, it promotes trust, drives innovation and strengthens their commitment to doing their best work. We base our hiring processes, training and culture off of the feedback from our employees — if they aren’t bought in then it’s all for naught.

 

ReviewTrackers team in group photo
ReviewTrackers

ReviewTrackers

ReviewTrackers’ VP of Sales Jeff Pearlman said despite aggressive hiring goals, the customer feedback software platform only brings a new salesperson onboard if all hiring managers are a “hell yes.” This ensures that they only hire top performers who are highly self-motivated. 

 

What’s your blueprint for building a sales team? How did you identify these keys and how have they made an impact as you build a team?

It all starts with hiring the right people. We look for people who are curious, collaborative and competitive. Our culture avoids micromanagement at all costs, which means the people we hire must be autonomous and highly self-motivated. To build on those strengths, we make sure we have the right training and support system in place so that every rep has the correct tools and training to succeed. We also have a scaling compensation plan that rewards over-achievers as well as a clear career progression plan to make sure the team knows exactly how to earn promotions. 

Most of this was identified by myself and my sales management team based on successes and failures in previous roles. For example, in one of my past jobs I saw multiple top performing reps who had exceeded their quota be placed on performance management for not making enough calls. These double standards never made sense to me, and they were a driving force behind how we look at metrics.

 

"Our culture avoids micromanagement at all costs, which means the people we hire must be autonomous.”

 

When scaling, how do you ensure your team doesn’t lose the elements that made it so successful in the first place?

The key is to make sure we have the right support system in place. When we started our hiring push this year, we evolved our training model from a scrappy, startup-based new hire training model to a comprehensive curriculum, which included several weeks of training from multiple leaders from across the company. We are also fortunate to have a great group of individual contributors who are highly competitive but also help each other and share sales best practices. This model allows new reps to have mentors while they continue their ongoing training.

When it comes to hiring, we follow the mentality of “it’s either a hell yes or it’s a no.” This is hard to do in a tough market with aggressive hiring goals but as long as we stick to this, we know we will bring on the right people and not sacrifice our culture.

 

Pricefx leaders and an elf
pricefx

Pricefx

VP of Sales in the Americas Dan Costanzo said building an atmosphere of trust and continuous learning at pricing software company Pricefx is the key to sales success. And that goes for sales leaders as well as new account execs. 

 

What’s your blueprint for building a sales team? How did you identify these keys and how have they made an impact as you build a team?

I look for self-empowered individuals who demonstrate a sense of urgency and a passion for delivering value to customers. In doing so, they reap not only personal success, but also a high degree of professional satisfaction in being part of a collective effort felt by customers, colleagues and the market. The best way to identify these characteristics is by gaining a sense of candidates’ professional values and personal initiative. 

 

"The best way to learn and grow as a professional is through learning from my peers.”

 

When scaling, how do you ensure your team doesn’t lose the elements that made it so successful in the first place?

Ensure that candidates are well-grounded in the values of the founders. I have always believed that the best way to learn and grow as a professional is through learning from my peers, so building an atmosphere of trust and continuous learning is very important to me.

 

Chowly team in group photo
chowly

Chowly

As the VP of Sales at Chowly, which integrates third-party delivery platforms with restaurants, Tom Lawton does his best to pay attention to his individual team members. This means understanding understanding what motivates them — individually and collectively — as well as hearing what changes they’d like to see to sales protocols.

 

What’s your blueprint for building a sales team? How did you identify these keys and how have they made an impact as you build a team?

While I don’t believe there is a cookie-cutter blueprint to building and scaling a successful sales team, I do believe there are key factors to ensure the team has the opportunity to be successful. 

As a sales leader, creating a strong collaborative culture is the first thing I set out to do. You spend more time during the week at work with your team than you do with family and I am very intentional in building a team environment that supports that. After building that cultural foundation, you learn what motivates individuals and teams, so you can identify which levers to pull in certain situations. This could mean additional bonus incentives for a given time period, or collaborating with marketing on a specific message we want to spread to drive additional leads. 

Next, I really drive home understanding the science and art of sales, like knowing how many touch points, conversations and scheduled pitches it takes to close. Combining that with what you say, how you say it and your mindset throughout the entire sales process brings the formula of the science plus art to life.

 

I believe that while hiring is very critical, retaining your sales reps is even more important.”

 

When scaling, how do you ensure your team doesn’t lose the elements that made it so successful in the first place?

I believe that your team carries the culture as you scale. Ensuring that you never stop learning and continue to take in as much feedback from your team as possible as you scale is important. Every time we onboard someone, we ask for as much feedback as possible to ensure the next time, we get better as a leadership team. 

I want to ensure everyone has a voice as we grow. We hold quarterly meetings on any “sales-bible rule” changes the team would like to vote on. We create certain criteria but ultimately, the team adjusts the "settings" so we have 100 percent buy-in and alignment across the organization. 

While hiring is very critical, retaining your sales reps is even more important. From managers and directors to VPs, I want to make sure that when we hire someone, we give them every possible chance to succeed.

 

BigTime Software sales team in group photo
BigTime Software

BigTime Software

A quarterback can’t succeed if they’re told to act as a team’s punter. BigTime Software’s Senior VP of Sales Michael Morrison believes that putting people in positions where they can succeed based on their skills is key to building a successful sales team.

In order to do that, he said it’s first necessary to determine the specific skills needed for success in each role. 

 

What’s your blueprint for building a sales team? How did you identify these keys and how have they made an impact as you build a team?

When I build a sales team, I always start by researching and quantifying targets. Understanding who prospects are, where to find them and how to best engage with them is essential to organizing the most effective team. 

Based on over 20 years of experience in sales, I believe the second step is putting the right people in the right roles by establishing the critical skills and competencies for each position on the team. This ensures that you are hiring, training and evaluating talent based on the most relevant criteria.

The final step is execution and iteration based on the key performance indicators of the business. Are team members achieving their goals? Why or why not, and what can leaders do to help? 

 

"A formula of regularly celebrating wins while learning from losses helps to foster an open and transparent culture.”

 

When scaling, how do you ensure your team doesn’t lose the elements that made it so successful in the first place?

This is accomplished by putting people first. Whether it’s training or hiring, you must establish practices that ensure that you hire individuals based on the right criteria and that you are providing them with the environment and the resources to be successful. This, along with a formula of regularly celebrating wins while learning from losses, helps to foster an open and transparent culture where people can contribute, develop and grow as the organization scales.

 

TripActions team in group photo
TripActions

TripActions

Commercial Sales Manager Jordan Gorosh and other leaders at TripActions encourage their sales teams to put both themselves, and the customers, first.

Gorosh said users of the business travel booking platform are a priority and striving to meeting their needs is a foundational value. However, employees are also pushed to invest in their own professional needs by advancing their skills through the company’s continual learning framework.

 

What’s your blueprint for building a sales team? How did you identify these keys and how have they made an impact as you build a team?

The DNA of any sales team is built on its people and we place a strong emphasis on making sure each person is a cultural fit for the organization. Our core value of putting the user first is tied intrinsically to our sales team, and its leaders cascade that value throughout the team early and often. As we’ve grown and scaled our team to match that growth, keeping our users top-of-mind ensures we’re finding the right people who will own our mission and beliefs.

 

"We center our teams around the concept of continuous learning...”

 

When scaling, how do you ensure your team doesn’t lose the elements that made it so successful in the first place?

We center our teams around the concept of continuous learning, accountability, real-time feedback and personal reflection. Each TripActions employee is trained to use our debriefing and continual learning framework to ensure that no matter how fast we’re moving, we’re taking the time to learn for our own sakes and the sake of the business. 
 

Onna presentation
Onna

Onna

Have you ever struggled to find your keys, with no recollection or roadmap to even narrow down the search (did you leave them in the kitchen or on your desk)? Onna helps you find what you’re looking for, no matter where “it” is, within  a digital landscape. We recently spoke with Russ Grant, VP of revenue, about why understanding how they support businesses is key in growing their sales team. 

 

What’s your blueprint for building a sales team? How did you identify these keys and how have they made an impact as you build a team?

There is no blueprint, unfortunately. Each company needs to understand its market, buyer and internal team, and base their hiring plan off of those audiences. We serve such a huge potential market. Near-term, we are focused on building value for mission-critical applications for legal, compliance and IT teams and companies.

Building a team at our stage is truly about diversity. Different approaches to the sales process, ways of thinking about the industry and team interaction all play into our hiring decisions. 

 

"Training, onboarding and culture are all constantly a work in progress.’’

 

When scaling, how do you ensure your team doesn’t lose the elements that made it so successful in the first place? 

We’ve set out with a plan for scale. How do we support a business a thousand times our current size? This helps us make decisions in context and set expectations for the amazing people we’re bringing on. 

Training, onboarding and culture are all constantly a work in progress. We don’t pretend to have a perfect mold. We’re also building an international team, so we have to simultaneously look for ways to integrate and enable every employee for success. Even if it’s a new role, we ask employees what they feel they need to succeed. 

 

Fundera team
fundera

Fundera

The path from your apartment to the building’s laundry room isn’t the only place you’ll find five steps. We recently spoke with Tom McNulty, VP of sales at Fundera, who outlined how his team stays on course and continues to grow using distinct categories of achievement. Fundera is a marketplace for small business financial solutions that’s making big strides.  

 

What’s your blueprint for building a sales team? How did you identify these keys and how have they made an impact as you build a team?

If you are building a sales organization within a company, I have found that there are five steps to focus on. These include learning and development, repeatability, continued growth, profitability and horizontal expansion. At the beginning, don’t set robust targets. Hire industry professionals to speak to customers. Determine whether you can make your process repeatable while you implement compensation plans and workflows that you need in order to scale. 

During this stage, you will see a slight shift in growth. Simultaneously, hire traditional sales people versus industry experts and look at the long-term value of the system that has been set up. Lastly, utilize the process. Can you open up your organization to offering other product lines?

 

"Every organization needs to determine when sales is its own function.’’

 

When scaling, how do you ensure your team doesn’t lose the elements that made it so successful in the first place? 

Every organization needs to determine when sales is its own function. For example, at Fundera, we have sales development, sales operations and sales training in order to ensure that our sales function continues to grow and thrive. I do not believe that culture scales. I believe that culture shifts and you define your team based on that. You must effectively navigate the culture; not scale it. Keep what works and discard what doesn’t. 

 

Meetup team
meetup

Meetup

If you’re interested in underwater hockey or needlepoint-based crafts, it turns out you’re not alone. At Meetup events across the country, people can (and do) come together to pursue their interests and make connections with like-minded individuals. While that concept isn’t exactly a tough sell, Enterprise General Manager JD Singh told us how the sales team effectively gets clients through the funnel.  

 

What’s your blueprint for building a sales team? How did you identify these keys and how have they made an impact as you build a team? 

Setting up clear processes and objectives is extremely important when building a highly efficient sales team. Ambiguity leads to misunderstanding, poor results and unhappy people. Having a clear process helps the teams learn quickly and achieve concrete results. Tracking the appropriate metrics tied to objectives and setting up a solid incentive system aligned with those objectives will lead to efficient teams who execute.

 

"Culture and focus are key factors in scaling any team.’’ 

 

When scaling, how do you ensure your team doesn’t lose the elements that made it so successful in the first place? 

Culture and focus are key factors in scaling any team. A sales machine needs to not only develop the ability to get clients through the funnel efficiently, but also  get sales representatives ramped up efficiently. Being data-driven and tracking how the team is doing on both fronts helps identify problems earlier.

 

AlphaSense
Alphasense

AlphaSense

Information processing takes on a whole new meaning when you consider machine learning and artificial intelligence. Take, for example, AlphaSense’s AI-powered search engine. It enables businesses to access data-driven insights in seconds. Looking for a comprehensive view of AlphaSense’s hiring process and scaling methods? Vice President of Sales Enablement Alea Homison has that and more, below. 

 

What’s your blueprint for building a sales team? How did you identify these keys and how have they made an impact as you build a team?

Our blueprint begins with a robust interview process that allows us to identify and attract the best talent. We focus on core characteristics we know make people successful at AlphaSense: grit, coachability and curiosity. Our interview process, which includes assignments, helps us to clearly identify each of these characteristics. 

Once individuals join the AlphaSense family, our sales enablement efforts set them up for success throughout their entire career, from our onboarding and performance ramp programs to our ongoing sales effectiveness program while they remain here and become a vet.

 

"Learning is so core to our culture...’’ 

 

When scaling, how do you ensure your team doesn’t lose the elements that made it so successful in the first place? 

We have an amazing culture that we are exceptionally proud of. Instead of focusing on protecting it, we focus on adding to and growing it over time. That said, we have sales enablement programs (onboarding, new hire performance ramp and ongoing sales effectiveness) that help us scale our training programs and provide consistent support for our sales team. Learning is so core to our culture that our investment in the professional development of our employees is inherent to our DNA. We have fun as we work hard by creating initiatives and friendly competitions in unique formats. 

 

DigitalOcean
DigitalOcean

DigitalOcean

In a perfect world, DigitalOcean Director of Inside Sales Ken Dooley sees managers treating new hires with the same level of consideration and necessary guidance as if they were direct reports. The sales division at the open-source cloud software company ensures that everyone is fully on board as the team forges new paths, an approach that is especially crucial amid rapid growth. 

 

What’s your blueprint for building a sales team? 

I like to follow some guiding principles like “define your key outcomes” from the start. Let those drive every decision the team makes. Establish the “how” with clear guidelines to help the team as they work toward those desired outcomes. 

Finally, ensure everyone really understands the key outcomes and has what they need to achieve individual and team goals. Hire amazing people with diverse backgrounds and perspectives and ensure they have what they need to be successful.

 

How did you identify these keys and how have they made an impact as you build a team?

These key principles are the result of my own learning, iterating, and course correcting  throughout the years. I’ve been lucky enough to have managers and mentors who encouraged me to take risks and not be afraid to fail. Innovation comes from failure.

I try to encourage the same kind of self-direction and autonomy with accountability on my own teams. I strongly believe that if you’ve taken the time to hire the right person and you set them up for success with clear outcomes, you have to give them the space to learn and flourish. That said, it is critical that poor performance is identified and managed quickly. 

 

"I’ve been lucky enough to have managers and mentors who encouraged me to take risks...’’

 

When scaling, how do you ensure your team doesn’t lose the elements that made it so successful in the first place? 

Don’t throw out the things that have worked previously just because your team is growing. When you scale, it’s important that team leads and hiring managers uphold the same key principles through their hiring, onboarding, training and coaching practices. While not every new hire will be your direct report, they are still on your team. Ensure every new person has the same level of understanding and clarity about the key outcomes and guidelines.

 

BetterCloud team
Bettercloud

BetterCloud

On the BetterCloud sales team, success isn’t an individual sport. Chief Revenue Officer Christopher Jones told us how their leaders constantly improve their skills based on what has worked well for the team in the past. Additionally, a competition-based structure helps fuel employees’ fire to keep the SaaS operations management platform aglow. 

 

What’s your blueprint for building a sales team? How did you identify these keys and how have they made an impact as you build a team?

I believe that being a positive, high-energy servant leader is the most effective blueprint to building consistently high-performing sales teams. We have an extreme passion for winning, ensuring our teams relish the grind required to do so consistently. We have a strong team of sales leaders who are committed to coaching their direct reports to be sales champions. We value representatives who are relentless about winning, embrace a growth mindset, practice self-discipline, are team players and have a desire to be truly extraordinary. We look for examples of these traits throughout the interview process. When those candidates apply them here, success is pretty much a certainty.  

 

"We have a ‘best is the standard’ sales culture.’’ 

 

When scaling, how do you ensure your team doesn’t lose the elements that made it so successful in the first place? 

Earlier this year, we hired a superstar named Meredith Dowd to lead, further develop and strengthen our onboarding and ongoing enablement program. Under her leadership, we have added quite a bit of rigor, consistency and scale to BetterCloud’s sales excellence programs. 

We are dedicated to putting all the required enabling conditions in place to get and keep our teams on the leading edge of sales practices. We have a “best is the standard” sales culture. We celebrate firsts, personal bests, new sales records, wins and leadership performances in a big way. 

Our top performers have a strong yet friendly rivalry so they always keep their edges sharp. Consistent communication is a huge tenant of my scaling growth playbook. This includes weekly sales leaderboard update emails, extended team hangouts, ongoing town hall sessions and our top performers sharing their best-of-the-best practices. 

 

Flexport team members in group photo
Flexport

Flexport

What happens when you have hiring and onboarding processes that are documented every step of the way and are repeatable across dozens of offices spread across three continents?

According to Director of Sales John Huelskamp, you get Flexport’s standardized (and effective) method of hiring and training new salespeople. 

 

What’s your blueprint for building a sales team? How did you identify these keys and how have they made an impact as you build a team?

We have had to adapt our blueprint as we’ve transitioned through many phases of growth. But the five key tenets of this blueprint are our people, process, goals, enablement and culture. Hiring talented people requires a deep understanding of the unique qualities and characteristics that lead to success at a company. We prioritize candidates that are personable, intelligent and coachable. We also look for candidates that demonstrate grit, tenacity and passion.

Over the years, we’ve continued to refine our sales process so that it’s clear, repeatable, data-driven and supported by the right tools and systems. Similarly, employee goals need to be clear, realistic and aligned with company objectives. When goals are set correctly, you reward top performers and maintain a high level of motivation across your team.

 

"We try to create as many coaching opportunities for new hires as possible.”

 

When scaling, how do you ensure your team doesn’t lose the elements that made it so successful in the first place? 

We’re constantly trying to improve how we onboard, train and enable our new hires to have as much success as possible. Learning styles can vary, so we blend classroom-style training during a new hire’s first few weeks in “Flexport Academy” with local enablement through a curriculum that covers departments across our LA office. 

We try to create as many coaching opportunities for new hires as possible, so our sales culture emphasizes shadowing, role-playing and team-selling. We also encourage collaboration more than competition. 

 

Happy Returns team in group photo
happy returns

Happy Returns

Happy Returns partners with retailers to make customers’ product-returns easy.

Co-founder and CEO David Sobie said that spirit of cooperation is also taken up by the company’s sales and marketing teams, who collaborate relentlessly to drive value for the business. 

 

What’s your blueprint for building a sales team? How did you identify these keys and how have they made an impact as you build a team?

We have a playbook that wins, with a focused go-to-market strategy, clear segmentation and targeting, and defined roles and responsibilities.

Having a leader who sets the bar high is important. Who do sales professionals want to be like as their careers progress? Someone that prioritizes strategy execution, keeps the team on target, is tied at the hip with the marketing and customer success teams and who brings crucial field information back to company leadership.

We also hire people with a history of high performance, a passion for our mission and a competitive drive to win. Emotional intelligence and IQ are equally important. A knowledge of the industry is also a plus.

 

"Having a leader who sets the bar high is important.”

 

When scaling, how do you ensure your team doesn’t lose the elements that made it so successful in the first place? 

We obsess over the basics. We have weekly pipeline reviews, one-on-ones and shadowings. The marketing team attends our important meetings and we attend theirs. We also have monthly messaging and content syncs for sales training. Everything we do comes back to your values. Is the team complaining about prospect and customer demands? Then it’s time to revisit our strategy.

And we make sure to have fun. We joke with each other a ton and have holiday potlucks, monthly happy hours and Friday themed days. 

We look for empathy among our friends, doctors and therapists. But films like “The Wolf of Wall Street” depict that characteristic as having little to no place in business or finance. A peek inside the sales teams of three Seattle tech companies tells a different story. 

Hiring and training the right people for the job came up again and again in our conversations –– a strategy not to be confused with hiring the best individual seller or the most enthusiastic. While attitude and credibility is crucial in any role, you want your front line of defense to be straightforward and trustworthy, from their first interaction with a client to their last. 

 

Auth0 team meeting
Auth0

Auth0

Identity theft is a phenomenon that unfortunately pretty much everyone can relate to. But worse than having to cancel your credit card? Having your tech stack compromised. Auth0 is dedicated to making that an issue of the past, with an identity solution that’s easy to implement and customize. VP/GM Ghazi Masood told us how he authorizes top talent for the business. 

 

What’s your blueprint for building a sales team? How did you identify these keys and how have they made an impact as you build a team?

First, assess market segments and geographies that require focus. Next, hire professionals who come from credible software organizations with track records for success. Additionally, hone in on key traits such as tenacity, drive, hunger and being a team player, which are paramount in building an A-team. 

 

"Hire professionals who come from credible software organizations with track records for success.’’

 

When scaling, how do you ensure your team doesn’t lose the elements that made it so successful in the first place? 

We should never sacrifice the amount of investment being made during the hiring and onboarding process. We take this quite seriously and feel we have a blueprint for one of the most thorough onboarding programs in the industry. Additionally, we foster a promote-from-within culture where the individuals can clearly see what lies ahead and what metrics and benchmarks are needed for career advancement.

 

vCita team
vCita

vCita

Orel Levit, director of sales at vCita, is all about structure. Before he told his team what to expect from him, he mapped out leadership qualities that he expects from himself. And it’s clear where that structure and hard work fits into the business management and client engagement app, from the scheduling software feature to the online payment portal. 

 

What’s your blueprint for building a sales team? How did you identify these keys and how have they made an impact as you build a team?

When building a sales team, it’s important to understand what sales methodology is right for the type of customers you’re facing and the product you’re selling. Once I figured that out, I chose four values for myself and my team to follow: hard work, believing in yourself, proportion and appreciation. These four values create two pillars: momentum and resilience. 

Working hard and believing in yourself and in your team creates momentum. Putting your successes and failures into proportion and appreciating the opportunities you get every day creates resilience. Being resilient and keeping the momentum going has led to our success.

 

"Your leading representative shouldn’t always be your first pick to become a manager.’’ 

 

When scaling, how do you ensure your team doesn’t lose the elements that made it so successful in the first place? 

This might be the hardest part about growing your sales team. Your highest priority is making sure you promote the right people to sales management. Your leading representative shouldn’t always be your first pick to become a manager. Choose the person who isn’t focusing only on their individual success but also helps the rest of the team while performing at a high level.

Once you have a quality leader, focus on training. Have weekly group meetings and one-on-ones to go over objection handling, pitches and call structure. But make it scalable. We created an online sales playbook available for the team that we update weekly.

 

K2 team
k2

K2

When it comes to successful achievement of any goal, whether it be frequenting that new boxing class or finishing the book you started last summer, all roads lead to consistency. Block off two days a week on your calendar and before you know it, you’ll be a regular. K2’s Director of Inside Sales Jennifer Dema recently told us that in terms of setting clear targets, sales isn’t much different. The company builds and runs business applications including forms, workflow, data and reports.

 

What’s your blueprint for building a sales team? How did you identify these keys and how have they made an impact as you build a team?   

Our approach to building a sales team is defined by our overarching business objectives and how the sales team can support them. This starts with providing transparency around roles and responsibilities. We spend time defining and documenting expectations. This gives our team clear targets as well as the tools, training and resources needed to succeed. 

Establishing a program that clearly defines the career path for individuals who are achieving success within the sales organization has been vital for us. When team members have clear career progression and growth opportunities, they are innately more engaged, find ways to hit their goals and want to stay.  

 

"Our environment is collaborative and team-focused.’’

 

When scaling, how do you ensure your team doesn’t lose the elements that made it so successful in the first place? 

For our team to scale effectively, we have a repeatable sales process in place. This allows us to measure progress and make informed decisions along the way. We make sure that our process is accessible to all new hires so they can jump into their role, add value and hit revenue targets out of the gate. 

We also make sure all team members are focused on the same activities. This allows us to easily measure and monitor whether each individual is following the sales process, leading to less reliance on managers and empowerment to self-start. 

Our environment is collaborative and team-focused. We want our sales team to be with us for a long time, so we are committed to ensuring their success through monthly sales enablement sessions, monthly and quarterly incentives, as well as call review and shadowing for constructive feedback.

Great Companies Need Great People. That's Where We Come In.

Recruit With Us